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1
Obstacles for an Expat in Asia / Re: US Embassies and announcements.
« Last post by Willy The Londoner on August 15, 2017, 11:05:14 PM »
Relieve yourself of all this and the worry of making sure you have done everything and follow my advice and STAY AT HOME. Ha Ha  LOL

Willie


Considerations for Older Travelers     As an increasing number of older U.S. citizens are traveling abroad, the U.S. Department of State wants you to be prepared so you can enjoy your trip. Please consider the information when planning your trip.
   Travel Documents 
  • Make sure your travel documents – passports and/or passport cards are valid and have not expired.
  • Check to see if there is a Travel Warning or Travel Alert for your destination.
  • Check our Country Information to determine if:
    • you need a visa;
    • you have enough blank pages in your passport for entry stamps;
    • your passport will be valid six months beyond the end of your trip, or some countries maynot let you enter.
Stay Connected
  • Enroll in our Smart Traveler Enrollment Program.  Your information is stored securely and enables the Department of State, U.S. embassy, or U.S. consulate to contact you, your family, or your friends in an emergency according to your wishes.
  • Provide a copy of your itinerary, including contact information for where you will be staying to a friend or family.
  • Manage expectations – if you don’t plan to stay in touch on your vacation, let your family know you will not be in regular contact.   
  • Not all cell phones work abroad. If you want to have a cell phone with you as you travel you will need to check your cell phone coverage before you travel.
Health Information
  • Medical care in foreign countries varies and is often not up to U.S. standards.
  • Medicare does not cover you overseas.
  • We highly recommend that you obtain medical and dental health care that will cover you overseas.
  • We also recommend insurance.
  • Consider obtaining an advance healthcare directive before you travel but note that not all countries recognize them.
  • For more tips related to health issues, visit our website.  You may also find health information at the Travelers’ Health page of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.
Pharmacies and Medications
 
  • Bring an ample supply of medication to cover you for your trip and if possible, for a few extra days in case there are delays.
  • Have information from your doctor regarding your condition and your medication.
  • To avoid questions or delays at customs or immigration, keep medications in their original, labeled containers.
  • Know the generic name for your medication as those generic names may be more recognizable at pharmacies in a foreign country.
Financial Information
 
  • Determine whether you should try to exchange currency before you travel abroad.
  • Understand the currency rates at your travel destination.
  • Know whether or not credit cards are readily accepted and if traveler’s checks can be cashed and plan accordingly.
  • Make sure your credit card company knows you will be traveling abroad so they do not freeze your accounts.
  • Read the Crime section of the Country Information for the countries you will visit to review the ATM scams and other financial scams that may be targeting foreign visitors.  If ATM service is not widely available or is not secure, bring travelers checks and one or two major credit cards instead of planning to use cash.  Many banks in most countries will issue cash advances from major credit cards.
Accessibility and Accommodations Beware of Scams
  • Scammers intend to get money from their victims by making the victims believe they will gain something of great personal value (financial gain, a romantic relationship, helping someone in trouble, the safe return of a friend, etc.).
  • Scammers operate primarily via the Internet, email, and phone.  For more information, please review our information on International Financial Scams
Prepare for Emergencies
 
  • Leave emergency contact information and a copy of your passport biographic data page with family and trusted friends.
  • Carry emergency contact information for your family in the United States with you when you travel (be sure to also pencil it in the emergency contact information section of your passport).
  • Know the contact information for the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate, available on the Country Information page for each country and on each embassy or consulate’s website, and provide that information to your family and friends.
  • If there is an emergency situation where you are staying, such as civil unrest, disrupted transportation, or a natural disaster, prevent undue worry or concern by contacting your family and friends as soon as possible.
  • A secure way to maintain your emergency contact information is to enroll with our Smart Traveler Enrollment Program.
  • Take careful note of the cancellation policies for your travel and consider purchasing travel and luggage insurance.  Many credit card, travel, and tourism companies offer protection packages for an additional fee.

2
Obstacles for an Expat in Asia / Re: US Embassies and announcements.
« Last post by Robertt S on August 15, 2017, 07:17:13 PM »
 Considerations for Older Travelers     As an increasing number of older U.S. citizens are traveling abroad, the U.S. Department of State wants you to be prepared so you can enjoy your trip. Please consider the information when planning your trip.
   Travel Documents 
  • Make sure your travel documents – passports and/or passport cards are valid and have not expired.
  • Check to see if there is a Travel Warning or Travel Alert for your destination.
  • Check our Country Information to determine if:
    • you need a visa;
    • you have enough blank pages in your passport for entry stamps;
    • your passport will be valid six months beyond the end of your trip, or some countries maynot let you enter.
Stay Connected
  • Enroll in our Smart Traveler Enrollment Program.  Your information is stored securely and enables the Department of State, U.S. embassy, or U.S. consulate to contact you, your family, or your friends in an emergency according to your wishes.
  • Provide a copy of your itinerary, including contact information for where you will be staying to a friend or family.
  • Manage expectations – if you don’t plan to stay in touch on your vacation, let your family know you will not be in regular contact.   
  • Not all cell phones work abroad. If you want to have a cell phone with you as you travel you will need to check your cell phone coverage before you travel.
Health Information
  • Medical care in foreign countries varies and is often not up to U.S. standards.
  • Medicare does not cover you overseas.
  • We highly recommend that you obtain medical and dental health care that will cover you overseas.
  • We also recommend insurance.
  • Consider obtaining an advance healthcare directive before you travel but note that not all countries recognize them.
  • For more tips related to health issues, visit our website.  You may also find health information at the Travelers’ Health page of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.
Pharmacies and Medications
 
  • Bring an ample supply of medication to cover you for your trip and if possible, for a few extra days in case there are delays.
  • Have information from your doctor regarding your condition and your medication.
  • To avoid questions or delays at customs or immigration, keep medications in their original, labeled containers.
  • Know the generic name for your medication as those generic names may be more recognizable at pharmacies in a foreign country.
Financial Information
 
  • Determine whether you should try to exchange currency before you travel abroad.
  • Understand the currency rates at your travel destination.
  • Know whether or not credit cards are readily accepted and if traveler’s checks can be cashed and plan accordingly.
  • Make sure your credit card company knows you will be traveling abroad so they do not freeze your accounts.
  • Read the Crime section of the Country Information for the countries you will visit to review the ATM scams and other financial scams that may be targeting foreign visitors.  If ATM service is not widely available or is not secure, bring travelers checks and one or two major credit cards instead of planning to use cash.  Many banks in most countries will issue cash advances from major credit cards.
Accessibility and Accommodations Beware of Scams
  • Scammers intend to get money from their victims by making the victims believe they will gain something of great personal value (financial gain, a romantic relationship, helping someone in trouble, the safe return of a friend, etc.).
  • Scammers operate primarily via the Internet, email, and phone.  For more information, please review our information on International Financial Scams
Prepare for Emergencies
 
  • Leave emergency contact information and a copy of your passport biographic data page with family and trusted friends.
  • Carry emergency contact information for your family in the United States with you when you travel (be sure to also pencil it in the emergency contact information section of your passport).
  • Know the contact information for the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate, available on the Country Information page for each country and on each embassy or consulate’s website, and provide that information to your family and friends.
  • If there is an emergency situation where you are staying, such as civil unrest, disrupted transportation, or a natural disaster, prevent undue worry or concern by contacting your family and friends as soon as possible.
  • A secure way to maintain your emergency contact information is to enroll with our Smart Traveler Enrollment Program.
  • Take careful note of the cancellation policies for your travel and consider purchasing travel and luggage insurance.  Many credit card, travel, and tourism companies offer protection packages for an additional fee.
 
3
Your trip to China / Re: Qingdao aka "Oriental Switzerland"
« Last post by kenny on August 13, 2017, 08:54:38 PM »
My wife is the same way, I dont see how they can take it.
4
Your trip to China / Re: Qingdao aka "Oriental Switzerland"
« Last post by Robertt S on August 13, 2017, 07:41:38 PM »
Looks really nice there. The boat harbor looked cool.

Chinese beach, most look fully clothed.

I believe most older women in that area wear long sleeve shirts, long pants, and wide brim hats to avoid the sun. The common belief is that the darker your skin the lower your status, since most outdoor laborers have dark complexion constant exposure to the sun!

You will find an enormous market for skin whitening cremes and lotions in China and other parts of Asia. When I take my wife riding on my motorcycle here in Georgia, she dresses like she is going to the Arctic Circle when it is 95+ here in the shade.

5
Your trip to China / Re: Qingdao aka "Oriental Switzerland"
« Last post by kenny on August 13, 2017, 03:38:19 PM »
Looks really nice there. The boat harbor looked cool.

Chinese beach, most look fully clothed.
6
Your trip to China / Qingdao aka "Oriental Switzerland"
« Last post by Robertt S on August 12, 2017, 02:52:44 PM »
Here is some drone footage of my wife's hometown of Qingdao!

Enjoy,
Robertt S
7
The Campfire / Re: JUST FOR A LAUGH
« Last post by Robertt S on August 11, 2017, 07:26:56 AM »
To those of you who are nit-pickers about the meaning of words: there is a medical distinction between Guts and Balls. We've all heard about people having Guts or Balls, but do you really know the difference between them?
 In an effort to keep you informed, here are the definitions:
 GUTS - is arriving home late, after a night out with the guys, being met by your wife with a broom, and having the Guts to ask, “Are you still cleaning, or are you flying somewhere?” BALLS - is coming home late after a night out with the guys, smelling of perfume and beer, with lipstick on your collar, and slapping your wife on the butt and having the Balls to say, “You're next, Chubby.”
 I hope this clears up any confusion on the definitions.
 Medically speaking, there is no difference in the outcome.
 Both result in death...
8
The Campfire / Re: JUST FOR A LAUGH
« Last post by Robertt S on August 10, 2017, 10:47:13 PM »
  Wisdom From the Military   

"If the enemy is in range, so are you." - Infantry Journal
"It is generally inadvisable to eject directly over the area you just bombed." - U.S. Air Force Manual
"Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons." - General MacArthur
"You, you, and you ... Panic. The rest of you, come with me." - U.S. Marine Corp Gunnery Sgt.
"Tracers work both ways." - U.S. Army Ordnance
"Five second fuses only last three seconds." - Infantry Journal
"Any ship can be a minesweeper. Once."
"Never tell the Platoon Sergeant you have nothing to do." - Unknown Marine Recruit
"If you see a bomb technician running, follow him." - USAF Ammo Troop
"Though I Fly Through the Valley of Death, I Shall Fear No Evil. For I am at 80,000 Feet and Climbing."
"You've never been lost until you've been lost at Mach 3." - Paul F. Crickmore (test pilot)
"The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire."
"If the wings are traveling faster than the fuselage, it's probably a helicopter -- and therefore, unsafe."
"When one engine fails on a twin-engine airplane you always have enough power left to get you to the scene of the crash."
"Even with ammunition, the USAF is just another expensive flying club."
"What is the similarity between air traffic controllers and pilots? If a pilot screws up, the pilot dies; If ATC screws up, ... The pilot dies."
"Never trade luck for skill."
The three most common ex pressions (or famous last words) in aviation are: "Why is it doing that?", "Where are we?" And "Oh S...! "
"Friendly fire - isn't"
"Airspeed, altitude and brains. Two are always needed to successfully complete the flight."
"Mankind has a perfect record in aviation; we never left one up there!"
"Flying the airplane is more important than radioing your plight to a person on the ground incapable of understanding or doing anything about it."
"The Piper Cub is the safest airplane in the world; it can just barely kill you." - Attributed to Max Stanley (Northrop test pilot)
"There is no reason to fly through a thunderstorm in peacetime." Sign over squadron ops desk at Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ, 1970
"If something hasn't broken on your helicopter, it's about to."
"You know that your landing gear is up and locked when it takes full power to taxi to the terminal."
As the test pilot climbs out of the experimental aircraft, having torn off the wings and tail in the crash landing, the crash truck arrives, the rescuer sees a bloodied pilot and asks "What happened?". The pilot's reply: "I don't know, I just got here myself!" - Attributed to Ray Crandell (Lockheed test pilot)
 
9
The Campfire / Re: JUST FOR A LAUGH
« Last post by Robertt S on August 10, 2017, 10:39:51 PM »
Hillbilly Logic


 Billy Joe and Jim Bob have decided that it is time to improve their lifestyle and go back to school. They have taken the placement examinations, and are patiently waiting for the results. Finally, the counselor calls Jim Bob into her office.
"Congratulations, Jim Bob!" she says. "You have been accepted, and this semester you will be taking arithmetic and logic."
"Well," says Jim Bob, "I knows what 'rithmetic is, but what's this here Logic?"
"Here, I'll give you an example." says the counselor. "Do you own a weed-eater?"
"Why, yes Ma'am, I do."
"Then by using logic, I could deduce that you have a yard."
"I sure do! I've got me a big 'ole yard!"
"And if you have a yard, it stands to reason that you probably have a house."
"Yes Ma'am! It's a nice little house, and I'm right proud of it."
"And if you have a house, I'd be willing to bet that you're a married man."
"I sure am, to a pretty little gal at that!"
"And seeing that you're married, you are most likely heterosexual."
"Ain't no likely about about that, I am most certainly hetero-sexual! Say, you can tell all that about me just by using this logic stuff?"
"That's right," says the counselor.
"I think I'm gonna like this class!" says Jim Bob as he runs out to tell Billy Joe.
"Guess what Billy Joe?" says Jim Bob, "I got accepted, an I'm gonna be taking 'rithmetic and logic!"
"What's this here logic stuff?" says Billy Joe.
"Here, I'll show ya!" says Jim Bob. "You got a weed eater, dontcha Billy Joe?"
"Uh, no."
Jim Bob eyes his friend suspiciously. "Yer one of them queer folk, ain't ya..."
 
10
The Campfire / Re: JUST FOR A LAUGH
« Last post by JohnB on August 10, 2017, 03:44:18 PM »
I think this is an old posting, but what the f*ck.. 


Years ago, a young Navy Pilot was severely injured while ejecting from his A-4 Skyhawk
due to engine failure during a catapult shot from the aircraft carrier, but due to the heroics
of rescue helicopter and the ship's hospital staff, the only permanent injury was the loss of
one ear. Since he was now physically impaired he did not remain on flight status but eventually
became an Admiral. However, during his career, he was always sensitive about his appearance.

One day, the Admiral was interviewing two Navy Master Chiefs and a Marine Sergeant Major for
his personal staff. The first Master Chief was a Surface Navy-type and it was a great interview.
At the end of the interview, the Admiral asked him, "Do you notice anything different about me?"
The Master Chief answered, "Why, yes, Admiral. I couldn't help but notice that you're missing your
starboard ear and I don't know whether this impacts your hearing on that side.
" The Admiral got
very angry at this lack of tact and threw him out of his office.

The next candidate, an Aviation Master Chief, when asked this same question, answered "Well,
yes, Sir. You seem to be short one ear."
The Admiral threw him out as well.

The third interview was with the Marine Sergeant Major. He was articulate, extremely sharp, and
seemed to know more than the two Master Chiefs put together. The Admiral wanted this guy but
went ahead with the same question: "Do you notice anything different about me?" To his surprise,
the Sergeant Major said, "Yes, Sir. You wear contact lenses." The Admiral was impressed and
thought to himself, 'What an incredibly tactful Marine'. "And how would you know that?" the Admiral
asked. The Sergeant Major replied: "Well, Sir, it's pretty hard to wear glasses with only one fucking ear!"

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